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1

Cram product pages with feature specs

The standard recommendation for product page design is that we should focus on descriptive text about products' benefits rather than feature specs. But observing people shopping on various sites, Cyd Harrel found that customers often need specifics first. They typically scroll past general copy in their search for very specific and deal-breaking details that they want to have confirmed before considering putting the product to their list of options.

Links:

  • Take Your General Information and Shove It Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - April 04, 2019

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See also: Web page design (41) 


 

2

Users ignore decorative images

In this article, Jakob Nielsen shows how eyetracking studies reveal that user pay close attention to images on websites that contain relevant information (such as product images), but completely ignore "fluffy pictures" that are purely decorative.

What Jakob forgets to mention is that eyetracking equipment only records eye fixations and not peripheral vision, that is, what we are able to see outside the center of gaze. So the studies don't prove that "feel-good" imagery fail their mission.

Links:

  • Photos as Web Content Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 01, 2019

Permanent link Comments (1)

See also: Research (130)  Emotional design (10)  Web page design (41) 


 

3

How removing a button can make you $300,000,000 a year

In this article, Jared Spool tells a story of how his company helped an e-commerce site increase purchases by 45%.

The site lost lots of purchases because the required customer registration frustrated people. Usability tests showed that they resented having to register and repeat customers couldn't remember their account login.

The designers fixed the problem simply. They took away the Register button and made customer registration optional. With an increased sale of $300,000,000 the first year, the client was happy.

Links:

  • The $300 Million Button Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - January 15, 2019

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See also: Cases and Examples (28)  Shopping Carts (9)  Forms (30)  Cost-justification and ROI (28)  Usability testing (71) 


 

4

The ROI of usability is declining

Jakob Nielsen and co. has conducted a study that looks at the benefits of redesigning websites for usability. The study reports an average return of investment (ROI) of 83%. In 2002, the number was 135%.

According to Jakob, the ROI of usability has decreased for two reasons. First, the most obvious usability problems have been eliminated. Second, usability teams haven't been given more funding to challenge the less obvious problems.

Links:

  • Usability ROI Declining, But Still Strong Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - January 22, 2019

Permanent link Comments (2)

See also: Cost-justification and ROI (28) 


 

5

How to optimize landing page performance

Marketing Experiments Journal has made a number of A/B tests of landing pages (the pages people land on clicking ads or search result links).

They found that landing page performance can be improved by:
- Focusing on one objective for each page and driving everything on the page to that one objective
- Using a vertical flow through the centre of the page
- Eliminating elements that may distract eye path from the flow toward the objective
- Using visual elements to draw attention toward the call to action
- Avoiding use of off-page links

Links:

  • Landing Page Confusion-How Does Having More Than One Objective to a Page Affect its Performance? Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 08, 2019 - via Copyblogger

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See also: Research (130)  Persuasive design (23)  Landing pages (5)  Web page design (41) 


 

6

Common shopping cart mistakes

In this article, SURL revisits a study from 2002 of common e-commerce problems. They found that all of the following 2002 issues remain in 2007:

- Calling a shopping cart anything but a shopping cart or whatever is appropriate for the target users of the site's location
- Requiring users to click "Buy" instead of "Add to shopping cart"
- Giving little to no visual feedback that an item has been added to the cart
- Forcing the user to view the shopping cart every time an item is placed there
- Asking the user to buy other related items before adding an item to the cart
- Requiring a user to register before adding an item to the cart
- Requiring a user to change the quantity to zero to remove an item from the cart
- Not making it evident how to update the items in the shopping cart
- Requiring a user to scroll to find an update cart button
- Requiring a user to check out before showing the final costs including shipping and tax

Links:

  • Top Ten Mistakes of Shopping Cart Design Revisited Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 12, 2019

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See also: Research (130)  Shopping Carts (9) 


 

7

B2B sites suck

Business-to-business websites have substantially lower usability than mainstream consumer sites. In a usability test, the B2B sites earned a mere 50% success rate. In contrast, mainstream websites have a success rate of 66%.

According to Jakob Nielsen, the major problems with B2B sites are:
- The fail in supporting customers' decision-making process by preventing them from getting the information they need to research solutions
- They use segmentation that don't match the way customers think of themselves
- They require customers to register to get information, which they are very reluctant to do
- They lack pricing information (the users in the study prioritized prices as the most critical type of information)

Most of the test participants said that when they were thinking of doing business with a company, one of their first actions was to check out its website. By being user-hostile, the B2B sites turn away customers without ever knowing how many sales they've lost.

Links:

  • B2B Usability Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - May 30, 2019

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See also: Research (130)  Persuasive design (23) 


 

8

Free e-commerce search report

37signals have made their e-commerce search report from 2003 available for free. The report looks at the usability of search results from 25 of the internet's leading online retailers, and concludes with a comprehensive set of best practices.

For each retailer 37signal have tested:
- Are the search results accurate and relevant?
- How does the site handle misspellings?
- Can I sort the search results by useful criteria?
- Will the site understand related words and common synonyms?
- Can I search using mixed specifications such as gender, color, and price?
- Does the site provide helpful tips when it returns no results?

Links:

  • The report Evaluating 25 E-Commerce Search Engines Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 15, 2019

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See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  Search (27) 


 

9

11 ways to improve landing pages

When visitors click an online promotional creative they arrive at a landing page. The purpose of the landing page is to make the visitor do something (e.g. register for a newsletter or buy a product). Michael Nguyen gives 11 tips on how to make visitors take that desired action, where these five seem to be the most important:

- Eliminate unneeded elements that can distract visitors
- Make the landing page match the creative
- Remove navigation that isn't important to the conversion process
- Avoid the urge to promote or link to other areas of your site
- Place important elements above the "fold"

Links:

  • The article 11 Ways to Improve Landing Pages Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - July 12, 2019

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See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  Persuasive design (23)  Landing pages (5)  Web page design (41) 


 

10

Eyetracking study of e-commerce sites

Eyetools Inc and MarketingSherpa have published the report "The Landing Page Handbook". The report describes the results of an eyetracking study of typical e-commerce sites and has design guidelines for improving web page layout.

Some highlights from the report:
- The upper-left corner is always seen
- Most web pages are scanned, not read
- Any text that is underlined or blue get high readership and many people will read only the emphasized text before deciding to read on
- Material underneath images is viewed quite often
- People experience such a strong pull to look at images that they can trump left-to-right reading
- Navigational links or bottoms usually distract visitors from the main purpose of the page

Links:

  • The article Are Your Visitors Seeing What You Think? Open link in new window
  • The book The Landing Page Handbook Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - March 03, 2019 - via UI Designer

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Persuasive design (23)  Landing pages (5)  Eye-tracking (14)  Research (130)  Books (47) 


 
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