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1

New book on prototyping

Todd Zaki Warfel has outpaced me in my long-standing attempt to write a book on user interface prototyping. His book Prototyping - A Practitioner's Guide to Prototyping is now on sale. I haven't had the chance to read it yet (don't forget you promised me a copy, Todd), but I'll bet it's worth its price. Go get it!

Links:

  • Prototyping - A Practitioner's Guide to Prototyping Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 25, 2009

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See also: Prototyping and wireframing (120) 


 

2

Google Chrome comic book

The cartoonist Scott McCloud has made a comic for Google explaining the story behind their browser, Chrome. It's a pretty nerdy look behind the scenes, but a quite engaging way to communicate tech stuff.

It was originally designed as a printed comic to create hype about the new browser among journalists and bloggers.

If you don't know Scott McCloud, I can highly recommend his book Understanding Comics.

Links:

  • The Google Chrome comic book Open link in new window
  • Scott McCloud's book Understanding Comics at amazon.com Open link in new window
  • Scott McCloud's book Understanding Comics at amazon.co.uk Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 17, 2008 - via User Experience and Design

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See also: Envisionments (4) 


 

3

Book: Web Form Design

Luke Wroblewski's book about designing effective and engaging web forms is available for purchase. Luke has been writing a great deal about form design at his blog and I'm sure his book is worth a read.

Links:

  • The book Web Form Design Open link in new window
  • Luke's blog entries on form design Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - May 05, 2008

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See also: Forms (30) 


 

4

Book review: Sketching User Experience

Business Week has published a review of Bill Buxton's book Sketching User Experience.

To quote:

"Sketching User Experience is, nominally, a book about product design. But it would be just as accurate to say that it's a book about software development, or, more generally, about the often broken process of bringing new products to market..."

"For Buxton, the need to rethink the development process by inserting design into the front-end is all the more urgent because new technology ... introduce new levels of complexity to the challenge of product design."

"Buxton takes pains to distinguish sketches from prototypes, which are more detailed, more expensive, and more focused on testing or proving a single idea. If sketching is about asking questions, prototyping is about suggesting answers. Sketching takes place at the beginning of the development process, prototyping only later."

Links:

  • Business Week review of the book Open link in new window
  • The book at Amazon.com Open link in new window
  • The book at Amazon.co.uk Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 03, 2007 - via Putting People First

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See also: Prototyping and wireframing (120) 


 

5

UX Zeitgeist

At UX Zeitgeist you can find popular user experience related books, topics, and people.

According to their FAQ, "UX Zeitgeist combines input from the UX community with data from a variety of web services to generate an unequaled collection of UX books and related topics. UX Zeitgeist also profiles the trends that describe the field's evolution."

The service is provided by Rosenfeld Media. It's quite similar to Chris McEvoy's Usability Views except that Chris also has popular articles.

Links:

  • UX Zeitgeist Open link in new window
  • Chris McEvoy's Usability Views Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - April 08, 2007

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See also: Websites (11)  People and organisations (3) 


 

6

Book: Effective Prototyping for Software Makers

In January 2007, a new book on prototyping was published. It's a practical step-by-step book on how to create rapid paper and computer generated prototypes.

The book covers issues such as choosing prototyping method, deciding on fidelity, diagramming flows, evaluating prototypes, and how to create prototypes using different approaches and tools. It also has a short chapter on interface design guidelines.

The book is impressive 624 pages. The authors have reached this high volume by operating with a somewhat broad definition of what a prototype is (for example card sorting is called prototyping) and by explaining prototyping as an process composed of a myriad of phases and steps.

The exhaustive step-by-step approach might be educational for those new to prototyping. To me, it makes prototyping appear as an overwhelming and rigid undertaking rather than a creative and playful one.

Links:

  • The book at amazon.com Open link in new window
  • The book at amazon.co.uk Open link in new window
  • Companion website with sample chapters Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - February 21, 2007

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See also: Prototyping and wireframing (120) 


 

7

Part two of report on how to design web applications

Part II of the The Designer's Guide to Web Applications is out. In this 62-page report, Hagan and David Rivers examine seven of today's most innovative web applications, including:

- WebOffice
- Serenata Flowers
- Backpack
- SurveyMonkey
- Writely (now Google Docs)

The authors investigate the purpose of each application, its target users, and how each application tackles its specific design issues.

There is a free chapter of the report available.

Links:

Henrik Olsen - December 15, 2006

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See also: Web applications (6) 


 

8

Report on how to design web applications

Hagan Rivers has written a 54-page report that deconstructs some of today's most complex web applications. The report gives step-by-step guidance though the process of creating successful web application.

Links:

  • The Designer's Guide to Web Applications, Part I - Structure and Flows Open link in new window
  • Interview with Hangan Rivers about the report Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - December 07, 2006

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Web applications (6) 


 

9

The book Getting Real

37signals have made their book Getting Real available online for free (you can still buy a PDF and now they also have a paperback).

The book is about how to build successful web-based applications the "smarter, faster, easier way" and features a short chapter on interface design.

Links:

  • The book Getting Real Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 05, 2006

Permanent link Comments (1)

See also: The design process (24)  Web applications (6)  Online books (5) 


 

10

The book Designing Interactions

In his book, Bill Moggridge, designer of the first laptop computer and a founder of the design firm IDEO, has interviewed 40 influential designers that have shaped our interactions with digital technology. At the companion website, you can meet all the designers and hear excerpts from the interviews.

In the introduction and final chapter of the book, Moggridge tells the story of IDEO's design process and explains the focus on people and prototypes that has been successful at IDEO.

The book is 800 pages, richly illustrated, and comes with a DVD with 37 of the interviews.

At the time of writing this, Bill Moggridge is releasing a chapter of the book each week at the book's companion website.

Links:

  • The companion website Open link in new window
  • The book at Amazon.com Open link in new window
  • The book at Amazon.co.uk Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 30, 2006 - via LukeW

Permanent link Comments (3)

See also: Prototyping and wireframing (120) 


 
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