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Navigation (63)  Web page design (40)  Search (27)  Text (24)  Forms (30)  Links (19)  Guidelines and Standards (15)  Site design (14)  Ads (9)  Design patterns (8)  Sections (8)  Shopping Carts (9)  Error handling (7)  Home pages (9)  Help (3)  E-mails (3)  Sitemaps (2)  Personalization (1)  Print-friendly (1)  Landing pages (5) 
 

101

Users' expectations of search

Based on a usability test of a system that allows people to search a large set of content Donna Maurer interpreted the users' expectations of search:

- It is better to put more than one word in as one word gives too much stuff
- Adding an extra word gives fewer results
- The first word in the search box is more important than the other words
- If the words make a sensible phrase the search engine should return results for the phrase
- If the words do not make a sensible phrase, the search engine shouldn't look for the phrase.

Links:

  • Regular folks searching Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 14, 2005

Permanent link Comments (3)

See also: Search (27)  Research (129) 


 

102

Top Ten Web Design Mistakes 2005

It's time for Jakob Nielsen's Top Ten Web Design Mistakes. In 2005 Jakob has asked his readers about their opinion. Here's the result:

#1 Legibility problems due to small fonts and low contrast
#2 Non-standard links that violate common expectations
#3 Flash with no purpose beyond annoying people
#4 Content that is not written for the web
#5 Bad search
#6 Browser incompatibility
#7 Cumbersome forms
#8 No contact information or other company information
#9 Layouts with fixed width
#10 Photo enlargements that doesn't show the users the details they expect

Links:

  • The article Top Ten Web Design Mistakes of 2005 Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 03, 2005

Permanent link Comments (3)

See also: Forms (30)  Text (24)  Links (19)  Search (27)  Flash (6)  Browsers (3) 


 

103

Striving for consistency is the wrong approach

According to Jared Spool the problem with striving for consistency is that we focus our thoughts purely on the design. Instead, we should ask ourselves whether the users are able to understand how to use the product.

"When you think about consistency, you're thinking about the product. When you're thinking about current knowledge, you're thinking about the user."

So why do we gravitate to consistency?

"Because it's easier to think about. You don't actually have to know anything about your users to talk about making things consistent."

Links:

  • Consistency in Design is the Wrong Approach Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 19, 2005 - via elearningpost

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Site design (14) 


 

104

Simplifying registration forms

Six tips from Caroline Jarrett on how to make registration forms as easy as possible:

- Explain why you're asking people to register
- Make sure you offer something that users want
- Offer a sample that of what people will get if they register
- Ask as few questions as possible
- Be careful about asking invasive questions
- Don't ask people to register multiple times

Links:

  • Registration Forms - what to do if you can't avoid Them Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 11, 2005 - via Dey Alexander

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  Forms (30) 


 

105

Open new windows for PDF and other non-web documents

If you must use PDF or other PC-native documents on websites, open them in new windows. Jakob Nielsen gives the following guidelines:

- Open non-web documents in a new browser window.
- Warn users in advance that a new window will appear.
- Remove the browser chrome (such as the back button) from the new window.

According to Jakob Nielsen, users feel like they're interacting with a PC application when using PC-native file formats. When people are finished, they click the window's close button instead of the back button, and are surprised that the web page is gone. Because they are no longer browsing a website, they shouldn't be given a browser interface.

Links:

  • The article Open New Windows for PDF and other Non-Web Documents Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 29, 2005

Permanent link Comments (1)

See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  Navigation (63) 


 

106

Free e-commerce search report

37signals have made their e-commerce search report from 2003 available for free. The report looks at the usability of search results from 25 of the internet's leading online retailers, and concludes with a comprehensive set of best practices.

For each retailer 37signal have tested:
- Are the search results accurate and relevant?
- How does the site handle misspellings?
- Can I sort the search results by useful criteria?
- Will the site understand related words and common synonyms?
- Can I search using mixed specifications such as gender, color, and price?
- Does the site provide helpful tips when it returns no results?

Links:

  • The report Evaluating 25 E-Commerce Search Engines Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 15, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  E-commerce (27)  Search (27) 


 

107

Introduction to information scent

This article by Iain Barker introduces the concept of information scent and explains how creating strong information scents enables users to confidently step through a site and find the information they require.

"The principles around how to create stronger information scents are quite simple, providing users with more context makes it easier for them to select the best option."

Links:

  • The article Information scent: helping people find the content they want Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 15, 2005 - via Column Two

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Primers (14)  Navigation (63) 


 

108

Minimum requirements for international sites

Jakob Nielsen gives his advice on the minimum requirements for ensuring that international users can use your site:

- Accommodate both common and variable name spellings
- Offer a single field for persons names
- Accept an extended character set that goes beyond plain ASCII
- Refer to "postal code/ZIP code" instead of just ZIP code, which is a U.S.-only term.
- Allow for international phone numbers containing a varying number of digits and a country code
- Give measurements in both meters and inches
- Provide temperatures in both Fahrenheit and Celsius
- If you have a multistandard product, explicitly say so

Links:

  • The article International Sites: Minimum Requirements Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 09, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  Site design (14) 


 

109

Eyetracking as a supplement to traditional usability tests

SURL have studied how eyetracking can be used to supplement traditional usability tests. They found that eyetracking data can be used to better understand how users search the interface for a target and what areas of a page are eye-catching, informative, frequently ignored and distracting.

The study is based on a test of three toy e-commerce sites, which is described in detail in the article.

Links:

  • The article Hotspots and Hyperlinks: Using Eye-tracking to Supplement Usability Testing Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 02, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Research (129)  Web page design (40)  Eye-tracking (14)  Usability testing (68) 


 

110

Line length and reading performance

A study by SURL examines the effects of line length on reading performance. Twenty colleage-ages students read news articles displayed in 35, 55, 75, or 95 characters per line (cpl) from a computer monitor. Reading rates were found to be fastest at 95 cpl.

Users indicated a strong preference for either short or long line lengths. Some participants reported that they felt like they were reading faster at 35 cpl, although this condition resulted in the slowest reading speed.

Links:

  • The article The Effects of Line Length on Reading Online News Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - July 22, 2005

Permanent link Comments (2)

See also: Text (24)  Research (129) 


 

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