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Research (129)  Tips and guidelines (95)  Tools (106)  Books (47)  Audio and video (48)  Interviews (30)  Cases and Examples (28)  Talks and presentations (18)  GUUUI articles (11)  Primers (14)  Online books (5)  Posters (5)  Glossaries (3)  People and organisations (3) 
 

101

Download time doesn't impact on a site's usability

UIE keeps podcasting interesting interviews with Jared Spool. In this episode of the Usability Tools Podcast, Jared talks about a study that showed that a site's download time doesn't seem to impact on a site's usability. Instead, sites that are easy to use, fun and professional are perceived as being fast.

Apparently, people perceive time to take longer when they are in pain.

Links:

  • UIE Usability Tools Podcast: The Truth About Page Download Time Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 24, 2007

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See also: Interviews (30)  Audio and video (48)  Download time (5) 


 

102

Slides and audio from UX Week 2007

Adaptive Path has made slides and audio from the UX Week 2007 sessions available.

I can especially recommend:

- Sketching in Code: Using Prototypes to Visualize Interactions (description / slides / audio)

- Learning Interaction Design From Everyday Objects (description / slides / audio)

Links:

  • The UX Week sessions Open link in new window
  • Access to all the podcasts via iTunes Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 20, 2007

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See also: Talks and presentations (18)  Audio and video (48)  Prototyping and wireframing (119) 


 

103

Testing how well a site communicates its value

In this episode of the UIE Usability Tools podcast, Jared Spool is interviewed about UIE's Inherent Value Tests. It's a test designed to reveal why new users struggle to see the purpose and value of some product or service when a large body of loyal users is complete devotees.

The test is a modified usability test broken into two pieces. First, loyal customers are asked to give you a tour of the site and tell you what they find valuable. Second, new users are given tasks to see if they come up with the same values. By comparing the two tests, we can see what it is that the new users don't get and why.

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: Inherent Value Tests Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 19, 2007

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Usability testing (68)  Interviews (30) 


 

104

The 5-Second Test

In the fourth episode of the UIE Usability Tools, Jared Spool and Christine Perfetti talks about their 5-Second Test Method. By showing users a single content page for 5 seconds, you can tests whether a page clearly communicates its purpose.

In the podcast they discuss:
- Why 5-Second Tests should be used primarily to test a site's content pages
- Why 5-Second Tests aren't effective on most home pages
- How to conduct the test with users
- What some of the common mistakes design teams make when conducting a 5-Second Test
- How to recruit users
- How to combine 5-Second Test with other types of tasks

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: 5-Second Usability Tests Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 10, 2007

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See also: Usability testing (68)  Audio and video (48)  Interviews (30) 


 

105

How to render primary and secondary buttons in forms

In an eye-tracking study, Luke Wroblewski has looked at how users experience primary and secondary buttons (e.g. Submit and Cancel) in forms.

He found that creating visual distinction between primary and secondary buttons help people make good choices. An effective way to do this is to present secondary buttons as links. He also found that positioning the buttons to the left, in alignment with the input fields, increases completion times.

Links:

  • Primary & Secondary Actions in Web Forms Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 07, 2007

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See also: Forms (30)  Research (129) 


 

106

Jared Spool on how to structure sites with lots of content

In this episode of the UIE Usability Tools podcast, Jared is interviewed about how to use department and store pages to subcategorize sites with lots of content.

Jared talks about:
- How department and store pages help narrow down the content choices for users
- How Department pages help users make confident choices between galleries
- What sites successfully take advantage of department pages
- What common mistakes designers make when implementing department and store pages

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: Department and Store Pages Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 30, 2007

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Sections (8)  Site design (14)  Navigation (63)  Interviews (30) 


 

107

Jared Spool on gallery pages

In this second episode of UIE Usability Tools Podcast, Jared Spool is interviewed about UIE's research on gallery pages, that is, pages with lists of links to content.

In the podcast, Jared talks about:
- How galleries help users make confident choices
- What behaviour users exhibit when gallery pages fail them
- How to order links so users can successfully find their content
- Why alphabetized links are often viewed as randomly ordered links
- How to utilize trigger words, the specific words that have meaning to users
-Why longer gallery pages may help users

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: Gallery Pages Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 30, 2007

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Sections (8)  Site design (14)  Navigation (63)  Interviews (30) 


 

108

How to make useful and usable usability recommendations

In order to evaluate the quality of recommendations in usability reports, the CUE-4 study analysed reports from 17 usability teams who independently evaluated the usability of a hotel's website.

The study showed that only 17% of the recommendations were both useful and communicated in a comprehensible way.

In the light of their findings, the authors give the following recommendations:

- Communicate each recommendation clearly at the conceptual level
- Ensure that the recommendation improves the overall usability of the application
- Be aware of the business or technical constraints
- Show respect for the product team's constraints
- Solve the whole problem, not just a special case
- Make recommendations specific and clear
- Avoid vagueness by including specific examples in your recommendations

Links:

  • Making Usability Recommendations Useful and Usable Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 27, 2007

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See also: Research (129)  Usability testing (68) 


 

109

How to cure banner blindness

According to Jakob Nielsen, these are the four most effective ways to attract peoples' eyeballs to ads:

- Making ads look like dialog boxes
- Making ads look like native content
- Using plain text
- Including faces
- Including cleavage and other "private" body parts

While Jakob finds that the last three present no ethical dilemmas, the first two do: Making an ad look like native content violates publishing's principle of separating editorial content and paid advertisement. Making it look like a dialog box is just plain deceptive.

In the article, Jakob also discusses how banner blindness is still real: Users don't look at anything that resembles ads, even if they aren't. If they glance at them, they typically don't engage with them. Often, they don't even see the advertiser's logo or name.

Links:

  • Banner Blindness: Old and New Findings Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 20, 2007

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See also: Research (129)  Ads (9) 


 

110

Common shopping cart mistakes

In this article, SURL revisits a study from 2002 of common e-commerce problems. They found that all of the following 2002 issues remain in 2007:

- Calling a shopping cart anything but a shopping cart or whatever is appropriate for the target users of the site's location
- Requiring users to click "Buy" instead of "Add to shopping cart"
- Giving little to no visual feedback that an item has been added to the cart
- Forcing the user to view the shopping cart every time an item is placed there
- Asking the user to buy other related items before adding an item to the cart
- Requiring a user to register before adding an item to the cart
- Requiring a user to change the quantity to zero to remove an item from the cart
- Not making it evident how to update the items in the shopping cart
- Requiring a user to scroll to find an update cart button
- Requiring a user to check out before showing the final costs including shipping and tax

Links:

  • Top Ten Mistakes of Shopping Cart Design Revisited Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 12, 2007

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Research (129)  E-commerce (27)  Shopping Carts (9) 


 

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