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11

An interview with Peter Morville and Lou Rosenfeld

Since reviewing "Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, Second Edition" (AKA the Polar Bear book) we decided it would be of interest to our readers to interview the authors of this book to see how the role of IA has changed since the first edition was released. Meryl K. Evans conducted the interview.

Links:

  • An interview with Peter Morville and Lou Rosenfeld, Information Architects Open link in new window
  • Book Review: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, Second Edition Open link in new window

Nick Finck - December 12, 2002 - via Digital Web Magazine

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See also: Information architecture (13) 


 

12

The key to Amazon.com's success

According to Maryam Mohit, Amazon.com's V.P. of Site Development, the key to Amazon.com's success is a strong focus on customer experience, which is infused throughout all levels of the company and includes all aspects of the buying process.

"And it's not just the people you'd think, like designers and usability specialists. Our engineers are really strong about thinking about customer experience, and our operations team, the people who run the back-end operations. Are the boxes easy to open, what packing material do we use, how much packing material is in the box, is it recyclable?"

Monitoring the customer experience is also important to Amazon.com.

"Metrics are super important. It's not just measuring, but measuring the right stuff and understanding it."

"…we correlate our measurements with changes we've made on the site, to see what's driving what, how to position things on pages, and which features to delete."

Links:

  • An interview with Maryam Mohit, Amazon.com Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 23, 2002

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See also: E-commerce (22) 


 

13

Jakob Nielsen defends his authoritarian style

Many Web Designers dislike Jakob Nielsen because of his blunt and uncompromising style. In an interview at DigitalWeb, he defends himself:

"My job is to negotiate on behalf of the world's 500 million Internet users since they are the only stakeholders without representation on the design team. And it's one of the oldest tricks of negotiating that you never start out asking for a compromise deal. You start out asking for the ideal and then you negotiate down from there."

Links:

  • An interview with Dr. Jakob Nielsen Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 14, 2002

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14

User-Centered Design

This month Digital Web Magazine will focus on the theme of User-Centered Design. Kicking things off this week is an interview with Peter Merholz and Nathan Shedroff on User-Centered Design.

Links:

  • The interview Open link in new window
  • Peter Merholz Open link in new window
  • Nathan Shedroff Open link in new window
  • Meryl K. Evans Open link in new window

Nick Finck - October 09, 2002

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See also: Primers (11) 


 

15

IA and usability

Digital Web Magazine interviews Jeffrey Veen and Jesse James Garrett of Adaptive Path

Links:

  • interview Open link in new window

Nick Finck - August 14, 2002

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See also: Information architecture (13) 


 

16

Jakob Nielsen interview by QualityOfExperience

In this interview Jakob Nielsen states that more and more CEOs acknowledge the importance of website usability. But the next step is to do usability the right way. Usability is quite different from marketing research and methods, such as focus groups, won't do.

In the interview Jakob also criticise online product configurators for being to complicated to use, but states that "…if we did better analysis of the customer's real mental model of the space and then designed these tools appropriately…companies could probably save quite a lot of money on salespeople and call centers and things like that."

Links:

  • An interview with Jakob Nielsen Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - January 26, 2002

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