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11

How to transform field studies into features and functionality

Stephen Cox from the Australian consultancy Intuity has published a presentation with an overview of how to conduct field studies. The presentation features a case story about how a study of sports fans was transformed into improvements of the FOX Sports website.

Links:

Henrik Olsen - September 06, 2006 - via putting people first

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See also: Cases and Examples (28)  Talks and presentations (18) 


 

12

Video lecture about design thinking by Tim Brown from IDEO

Here's a one hour video starring Tim Brown from the design firm IDEO. He talks about how to fuel innovation by studying people and evolve and validate ideas through rapid prototyping and storytelling.

Links:

  • The video lecture Innovation Through Design Thinking Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 08, 2006 - via LukeW

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Prototyping and wireframing (119)  Talks and presentations (18) 


 

13

Demographics is not critical when recruiting study participants

When recruiting participants for usability testing, field research and the like, candidates experience and behaviour is more important than demographics.

According to Jared Spool, studies of user experience professionals have shown that successful teams have learnt that candidates' previous experience and how they will behave in the study is more important than where they live, how old they are, and how much they earn. You don't need to have someone who is in your target audience. You only need someone who behaves like people in your audience group and is comfortable with the study situation.

Links:

  • Putting Perfect Participants in Every Session Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 13, 2005

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See also: Research (129)  Usability testing (68) 


 

14

Segmenting online customers by behaviour

According to the authors of this article, the most effective segmentation scheme for online consumers is to group them by their online behaviour.

They have defined seven segments:

- Quickies (8%): Short visits to a few familiar sites.
- Just the Facts (15%): Search for specific information from known sites.
- Single Mission (7%): Information gathering or completion of a certain task at an unfamiliar site.
- Do It Again (14%): Visits to favourite sites.
- Loitering (16%): Longer leisure visits to familiar sites.
- Information, Please (17%): In-depth information gathering from a range of unfamiliar sites.
- Surfing (23%): Short visits to a lot of mostly unfamiliar sites.

The authors claim that by decoding the type of behaviour users are engaged in, online marketers will raise the odds of communicating with their target consumers at the time they are most likely to pay attention to and be influenced by offers.

Links:

Henrik Olsen - February 07, 2005

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See also: Persuasive design (21)  E-commerce (27)  Research (129) 


 

15

User Requirement Analysis on steroids

Dilbert to the User Requirement Analyst: Your user requirements include four hundreds features. Do you realize that no human would be able to use a product with that level of complexity?

User Requirement Analyst: Good point. I'd better add "easy to use" to the list.

Links:

Henrik Olsen - August 31, 2004 - via Usability First

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See also: Cartoons (14) 


 

16

Field Studies: The Best Tool to Discover User Needs

"The most valuable asset of a successful design team is the information they have about their users. When teams have the right information, the job of designing a powerful, intuitive, easy-to-use interface becomes tremendously easier. When they don't, every little design decision becomes a struggle."

Techniques such as focus groups, usability tests, and surveys are valuable, but according to Jared M. Spool from UIE, the most powerful tool in the toolbox is field studies. While it might be the most expensive technique to use, it has contributed to some of the most innovative designs.

With field studies, the team gets immersed in the environment of their users and allows them to observe critical "unspeakable" details. It eliminates guesswork and opinion wars, by providing the designers with a deep understanding of the users context, terminology, and processes.

Links:

  • The article Field Studies: The Best Tool to Discover User Needs Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - March 07, 2004

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17

First Rule of Usability? Don't Listen to Users

In his August 5, 2001 Alertbox, Jakob Nielsen writes about an old rule of usability, which I often hear myself preaching:

"To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior."

Asking people about their opinion of a product

Links:

  • The article First Rule of Usability? Don't Listen to Users Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 14, 2003

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18

balancing inputs

George Olsen (in a recent B&A; article) argues that the user is only one of the sources of information that should be considered when designing systems.

There needs to be a balance between considering the UX and design driven by ideas - possibly that the user doesn't even realise they need/want.

So the focus is again on persuasion rather than coercion. With the goal to achieve relevance and desirability.

Links:

  • The New R&D;: Relevant & Desirable Open link in new window
  • Interaction by Design (george's thoughts page) Open link in new window
  • Boxes and Arrows Open link in new window

ben hyde - March 03, 2003

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19

Information Architecture: Blueprints for the Web

In the introduction, Christina Wodtke claims that her book on IA isn't for people doing IA for a living since "most of it will probably be old hat." It might be true, that her book won't make a revolution for the IA field, but it is very enlightening to read about Wodtke's practical use of the techniques and principles of IA. And there's no armchair theory here. Everything is backed up by cases, examples, and practical advice on how to make everything work in the real world.

The book concentrates on traditional IA practices, such as:
- User research
- Organising content
- Card sorting
- Personas, scenarios and task analysis
- Site and flow diagramming
- Wireframing and storyboarding

At the end of the book, you'll also find some she-devil tricks on how to persuade you boss and co-workers to do things your way. Highly revealing - my girlfriend is never going to fool me again.

Links:

  • The book at amazon.com Open link in new window
  • The book at amazon.co.uk Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 14, 2002

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See also: Books (47)  Site and flow diagramming (6)  Card sorting (13)  The design process (24)  Personas (19)  Usability testing (68)  Prototyping and wireframing (119) 


 

20

Objections against user requirements analysis

According to Sim D'Hertefelt, requests for proposals for web projects describe the desired solution in terms of functionalities and technologies, but often lack basic information about the problem that will be solved. Without user requirement analysis the risk is that you won't solve any problems.

D'Hertefelt lists 13 common objections against user requirements analysis and why you should not believe them. You might have heard some off these before:

- We know what the user needs
- You're the internet expert. You should tell us what people need.
- We don't have the budget for user requirements analysis.
- It doesn't fit in our planning.
- Users don't know what they want.
- We're not at the university. We're a company developing a website.
- Our project is top secret. We can't approach the future users.

Links:

  • The article Why user experience disasters happen at the start of web projects Open link in new window
  • 13 common objections against user requirements analysis, and why you should not believe them Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 03, 2002

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