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11

Setting goals and measuring success for web sites

With this free e-book by Steve Jackson, editor of Conversion Chronicles, you can learn the basics of how to set up measurable goals for web site conversion, how to reach your goals through persuasive design and how to measure success with web site statistic tools.

You have to sign up for their newsletter to get the e-book (they are taking their own medicine and use the book to boost their newsletter conversion and prospect acquisition).

Links:

  • The e-book Learn before you spend Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 22, 2005

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See also: Online books (5)  Books (47)  Web traffic analysis (12) 


 

12

11 ways to improve landing pages

When visitors click an online promotional creative they arrive at a landing page. The purpose of the landing page is to make the visitor do something (e.g. register for a newsletter or buy a product). Michael Nguyen gives 11 tips on how to make visitors take that desired action, where these five seem to be the most important:

- Eliminate unneeded elements that can distract visitors
- Make the landing page match the creative
- Remove navigation that isn't important to the conversion process
- Avoid the urge to promote or link to other areas of your site
- Place important elements above the "fold"

Links:

  • The article 11 Ways to Improve Landing Pages Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - July 12, 2005

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See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  E-commerce (27)  Landing pages (5)  Web page design (40) 


 

13

Eyetracking study of e-commerce sites

Eyetools Inc and MarketingSherpa have published the report "The Landing Page Handbook". The report describes the results of an eyetracking study of typical e-commerce sites and has design guidelines for improving web page layout.

Some highlights from the report:
- The upper-left corner is always seen
- Most web pages are scanned, not read
- Any text that is underlined or blue get high readership and many people will read only the emphasized text before deciding to read on
- Material underneath images is viewed quite often
- People experience such a strong pull to look at images that they can trump left-to-right reading
- Navigational links or bottoms usually distract visitors from the main purpose of the page

Links:

  • The article Are Your Visitors Seeing What You Think? Open link in new window
  • The book The Landing Page Handbook Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - March 03, 2005 - via UI Designer

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See also: E-commerce (27)  Landing pages (5)  Eye-tracking (14)  Research (129)  Books (47) 


 

14

Segmenting online customers by behaviour

According to the authors of this article, the most effective segmentation scheme for online consumers is to group them by their online behaviour.

They have defined seven segments:

- Quickies (8%): Short visits to a few familiar sites.
- Just the Facts (15%): Search for specific information from known sites.
- Single Mission (7%): Information gathering or completion of a certain task at an unfamiliar site.
- Do It Again (14%): Visits to favourite sites.
- Loitering (16%): Longer leisure visits to familiar sites.
- Information, Please (17%): In-depth information gathering from a range of unfamiliar sites.
- Surfing (23%): Short visits to a lot of mostly unfamiliar sites.

The authors claim that by decoding the type of behaviour users are engaged in, online marketers will raise the odds of communicating with their target consumers at the time they are most likely to pay attention to and be influenced by offers.

Links:

Henrik Olsen - February 07, 2005

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See also: User research (23)  E-commerce (27)  Research (129) 


 

15

How to harvest offline customers using the internet

Since many customers research online and buy offline, there's big money in using the internet to harvest leads for offline sales. According to Bryan Eisenberg, retail sites should account for the different needs that customers have in the buying decision cycle to qualify, persuade, and eventually turn them into offline buyers.

Links:

  • The article Optimize Your Site for Lead Generation Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 23, 2004

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See also: E-commerce (27) 


 

16

Supporting customers' decision-making process

The Q2 2003 issue of GUUUI is about how people buy. Research shows that many commerce sites fail in supporting customers' decision-making process, by not taking their information needs into consideration. The article takes a look at how we can tackle this problem.

Links:

Henrik Olsen - April 01, 2003

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17

Merchandising with planograms

In two subsequent articles Martin Lindstrom from Clickz.com discusses the practices of up- and cross-selling used by brick-and-mortar retail stores and the potential in applying their principles to the web. The key is planogramming.

"A planogram is a detailed and thoroughly thought-through map that determines where every product in an establishment should be situated. It illustrates not only in what area every product should be placed but also on which shelf every item should be accommodated. Shelf by shelf, aisle by aisle, the planogram assigns selling potential to every item in a store."

Links:

  • The article Webogram Power, Part 1 Open link in new window
  • The article Webogram Power, Part 2 Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - December 05, 2002

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18

The Search For Seducible Moments

UIE takes a look at how to entice users to explore content they aren't necessarily seeking. They compare how Sears and Dell have tried to solve this common problem through the design of their sites.

"It's rare where we get a situation like we have with these two sites. They are basically the same, offering high-priced products with available financing. In this analysis, we can see how two sites handle seducible moments. Sears struggles to convince users to apply for financing, whereas Dell has an easier time. The difference between the sites is not in the content, but in the design."

Links:

  • The article The Search For Seducible Moments Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 10, 2002

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19

Selling and merchandising online

ClickZ columnist Bryan Eisenberg has written a wealth of interesting articles about how to sell and merchandise online. In Beyond Usability he describes what seems to be the guiding principle in his articles about web marketing:

"

Links:

  • The article Beyond Usability Open link in new window
  • Bryan Eisenberg's column ROI Marketing at ClickZ Open link in new window
  • Bryan Eisenberg's newsletter archive at grokdotcom Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 01, 2002

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See also: E-commerce (27) 


 

20

Design for impulse purchases

An experiment with 30 people conducted by UIE showed that the design of a site, rather than product price, is the primary reason why customers make impulse purchases on e-commerce sites. They also found that sites, which urge users toward the category links, are going to make more impulse sales than sites that encourage users to use the search engine. Some hard facts from the study:
- 39% of all the money spent on the e-commerce sites studied was impulse purchases
- Only 8% of the impulse purchases were related to price
- 87% of the dollars spent on impulse purchases resulted from users navigating the site by category links.
- The remaining 13% was spent after navigation via the sites' search engines

The larger amount of impulse buys when the users browsed categories links was caused by the fact, that the users was exposed to more of the site's products - both within and across product categories.

Links:

  • The article What Causes Customers to Buy on Impulse? Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 12, 2002

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See also: Research (129) 


 

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