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Research (129)  Tips and guidelines (95)  Tools (106)  Books (47)  Audio and video (48)  Interviews (30)  Cases and Examples (28)  Talks and presentations (18)  GUUUI articles (11)  Primers (14)  Online books (5)  Posters (5)  Glossaries (3)  People and organisations (3) 
 

111

Tutorial on how to create dynamic PDF prototypes

Contrary to what many believe, we can do more with PDF prototypes than create links and forms.

In this article, Kyle Pero Soucy explains how we can use PDFs to:

- Add dynamic elements such as rollovers and drop-down menus
- Mimic Ajax-like functionality by updating only parts of the PDF instead of an entire page
- Embed audio and video files
- Validate form data
- Perform calculations and respond to user actions

The prototypes can be created with our favourite prototyping tool. Once converted to PDF, we can add interactivity, audio and video to the prototype using Adobe Acrobat Professional.

Links:

  • PDF Prototypes: Mistakenly Disregarded and Underutilized Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 08, 2007

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Tools (106)  Prototyping and wireframing (119) 


 

112

Tutorial on how to create clickable prototypes with PowerPoint

One good reason for building prototypes with PowerPoint is that it's probably already sitting on your hard drive. Another is that anyone you want to share it with probably also has it.

In this tutorial, Maureen Kelly shows how to build working prototypes with PowerPoint by using its interactive features for creating hyperlinks, buttons, and dynamic mouseover effects.

Links:

  • Interactive Prototypes with PowerPoint Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 08, 2007

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See also: Tools (106)  Prototyping and wireframing (119) 


 

113

Jared Spool on how to design home pages

In the first episode of the weekly UIE Usability Tools Podcast, Christine Perfetti interviews Jared Spool about his thinking on home page design.

In the podcast, they discuss:
- Why a site's home page is actually the least important page on your site
- How the most successful designs focus on understanding users' main goals and tasks
- How "link-rich" home pages can help your users find their content
- How the most successful home page designs focus on driving users to the most important content pages
- Why users spend little time on the best home pages

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: Home Page Design Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 06, 2007

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Home pages (9)  Interviews (30) 


 

114

OmniGraffle wireframe palette

Michael Angeles has released a revision to his wireframe palette for OmniGraffle (a Machintosh diagramming tool).

Links:

  • Michael Angeles' OmniGraffle wireframe palette Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 26, 2007 - via Digital Web

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See also: Tools (106)  Prototyping and wireframing (119) 


 

115

Online card sorting tool

Optimal Usability has released a new online card sorting tool. You can set up tests, let users categorize information using a drag-and-drop interface and generate reports with the results. It supports both closed sorting, with fixed categories and open sorting, where the participants can name their own categories.

Unfortunately the tool doesn't allow participants to subcategorise items and to put items into multiple categories.

Links:

  • The online card sorting tool OptimalSort Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 18, 2007 - via DonnaM

Permanent link Comments (1)

See also: Card sorting (13)  Tools (106) 


 

116

Entertaining Jared Spool interview

Jared Spool is in his element in this highly entertaining and informative interview (in audio) where he answers questions from the audience at the 54th Technical Communication Summit.

Topics included:
- How do you break into the usability field?
- How has the field of usability evolved?
- How do you handle difficult clients?
- How do you handle powerful Dilbert-like engineers?
- What role should user testing play in design?
- Why do programmer watching usability test get flat foreheads?
- What is the best thing about users? Answer: "...eventually they die".

Links:

  • Podcast: Jared Spool Interviewed by Carolyn Snyder at STC 2007 Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 10, 2007

Permanent link Comments (3)

See also: Interviews (30)  Audio and video (48) 


 

117

Book review: Sketching User Experience

Business Week has published a review of Bill Buxton's book Sketching User Experience.

To quote:

"Sketching User Experience is, nominally, a book about product design. But it would be just as accurate to say that it's a book about software development, or, more generally, about the often broken process of bringing new products to market..."

"For Buxton, the need to rethink the development process by inserting design into the front-end is all the more urgent because new technology ... introduce new levels of complexity to the challenge of product design."

"Buxton takes pains to distinguish sketches from prototypes, which are more detailed, more expensive, and more focused on testing or proving a single idea. If sketching is about asking questions, prototyping is about suggesting answers. Sketching takes place at the beginning of the development process, prototyping only later."

Links:

  • Business Week review of the book Open link in new window
  • The book at Amazon.com Open link in new window
  • The book at Amazon.co.uk Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 03, 2007 - via Putting People First

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Books (47)  Prototyping and wireframing (119) 


 

118

Jared Spool on how bad usability and aggressive advertising can hurt brands

Google has published a 45 minute video with Jared Spool talking about online branding:

"What's the most effective way to strengthen a brand on the internet? Recent research shows that it isn't using traditional branding techniques. In fact, those tried-and-true methods can actually hurt your brand, if implemented poorly.

In this presentation, Jared Spool will discuss how User Interface Engineering's recent usability research has uncovered some fascinating truths about how people perceive brands on the internet."

Links:

  • Strike Up The Brand: How to Design for Branding (Google video) Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - May 31, 2007 - via Usability In the News

Permanent link Comments (2)

See also: Audio and video (48)  Ads (9)  Talks and presentations (18) 


 

119

Watch users navigate websites with ClickTale

ClickTale is an online service that allows you to watch movies of visitors interacting with your website.

The tool records visitors' mouse movements, clicks, keystrokes and scrolling actions. From the recordings, it generates movies of individual visitor's use of the site.

The tool can be used to gain insight into how visitors interact with websites, to find flaws and enhance navigation and overall usability. As such, it can serve as a good complement to existing statistics services and usability tests.

ClickTale is currently in closed beta, but you can register for an invitation.

Links:

  • ClickTale Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - May 08, 2007

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Tools (106)  Web traffic analysis (12)  Usability testing (68) 


 

120

UX Zeitgeist

At UX Zeitgeist you can find popular user experience related books, topics, and people.

According to their FAQ, "UX Zeitgeist combines input from the UX community with data from a variety of web services to generate an unequaled collection of UX books and related topics. UX Zeitgeist also profiles the trends that describe the field's evolution."

The service is provided by Rosenfeld Media. It's quite similar to Chris McEvoy's Usability Views except that Chris also has popular articles.

Links:

  • UX Zeitgeist Open link in new window
  • Chris McEvoy's Usability Views Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - April 08, 2007

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Websites (11)  People and organisations (3)  Books (47) 


 

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Methods and the design process

Prototyping and wireframing (119)  Usability testing (68)  Cost-justification and ROI (27)  User research (23)  Personas (19)  The design process (24)  Eye-tracking (14)  Card sorting (13)  Web traffic analysis (12)  Expert reviews (11)  Implementing user-centred design (9)  Site and flow diagramming (6)  Envisionments (4)  Use Cases (3) 

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General aspects

E-commerce (27)  Persuasive design (21)  Visual design (19)  Information architecture (15)  Accessibility (13)  Search engines (7)  Credibility, Trust and Privacy (6)  Emotional design (10)  Simplicity vs. capability (7)  Web applications (6)  Intranets (3) 

Technology

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Humour

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Resource types

Research (129)  Tips and guidelines (95)  Tools (106)  Books (47)  Audio and video (48)  Interviews (30)  Cases and Examples (28)  Talks and presentations (18)  GUUUI articles (11)  Primers (14)  Online books (5)  Posters (5)  Glossaries (3)  People and organisations (3) 

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