To the front pageThe Interaction Designer's Coffee Break - Weekly postings and quarterly articles about interaction design  
  To the front pageSign inTo the frontpageSearch in GUUUI postingsAbout GUUUI  
   
 

BROWSE GUUUI POSTINGS

 

21

Designing pages listing links to content

According to Jared Spool, gallery pages - pages listing links to content pages - are the hardest working pages on a web site. They separate those users who find the content they are looking for from the users who don't.

Studies by UIE show that when gallery pages don't contain the information that users will need to make their choice, they have to resort to "pogosticking" - jumping back and forth between the gallery and the content pages hoping they'll eventually hit the content they desire.

UIE also noticed that users expect the most important items to always be listed first in the gallery. If the first few items aren't of interest, they often assume the rest will be even less interesting.

Links:

  • Galleries: The Hardest Working Page on Your Site Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - December 01, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Research (105)  Persuasive design (14)  Sections (5)  Web page design (31)  Navigation (56) 


 

22

Setting goals and measuring success for web sites

With this free e-book by Steve Jackson, editor of Conversion Chronicles, you can learn the basics of how to set up measurable goals for web site conversion, how to reach your goals through persuasive design and how to measure success with web site statistic tools.

You have to sign up for their newsletter to get the e-book (they are taking their own medicine and use the book to boost their newsletter conversion and prospect acquisition).

Links:

  • The e-book Learn before you spend Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 22, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Online books (5)  Books (44)  Persuasive design (14)  Web traffic analysis (11) 


 

23

Usability is more important that aesthetics in the long run

The October 2005 newsletter from HFI is a discussion of how beauty can influence users' overall impression of a product and how to measure the product-emotion relationship.

The newsletter mentions a study by M. Hassenzahl where a MP3 application was evaluated with a variety of different visual designs. They study showed that:
- When participants only looked at the MP3 player, the overall rating of the product was based on its perceived beauty and anticipated usability
- When participants were allowed to use the player, the overall rating of the product was more influenced by participants' experience of using the product

The study suggests that the emotional aspects of a design are important in attracting customers in the first place. However, when the product is judged through usage over time, usability is what matters most.

Links:

  • Is Beauty the new usability attribute? Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - November 16, 2005

Permanent link Comments (1)

See also: Emotional design (6)  Visual design (16)  Usability testing (45)  Research (105) 


 

24

Free e-commerce search report

37signals have made their e-commerce search report from 2003 available for free. The report looks at the usability of search results from 25 of the internet's leading online retailers, and concludes with a comprehensive set of best practices.

For each retailer 37signal have tested:
- Are the search results accurate and relevant?
- How does the site handle misspellings?
- Can I sort the search results by useful criteria?
- Will the site understand related words and common synonyms?
- Can I search using mixed specifications such as gender, color, and price?
- Does the site provide helpful tips when it returns no results?

Links:

  • The report Evaluating 25 E-Commerce Search Engines Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 15, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Tips and guidelines (80)  E-commerce (23)  Search (24) 


 

25

11 ways to improve landing pages

When visitors click an online promotional creative they arrive at a landing page. The purpose of the landing page is to make the visitor do something (e.g. register for a newsletter or buy a product). Michael Nguyen gives 11 tips on how to make visitors take that desired action, where these five seem to be the most important:

- Eliminate unneeded elements that can distract visitors
- Make the landing page match the creative
- Remove navigation that isn't important to the conversion process
- Avoid the urge to promote or link to other areas of your site
- Place important elements above the "fold"

Links:

  • The article 11 Ways to Improve Landing Pages Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - July 12, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Persuasive design (14)  E-commerce (23)  Sections (5)  Web page design (31)  Tips and guidelines (80) 


 

26

Principles of visual design

Joshua David McClurg-Genevese takes a look at the principles of balance, rhythm, proportion, dominance and unity that guide the arrangement of objects within a visual design.

Links:

  • The Principles of Design Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 15, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Visual design (16) 


 

27

Categorization doesn't work for large amounts of information

According to Clay Shirky, the ways we apply categorization to the electronic world are based on bad habits. In his opinion tagging (free-form labelling, without regard to categorical constraints) is a better fit for large amounts of information.

Categorization can work for a limited information space that is based on formal and stable entities organized by small number of expert cataloguers. But it doesn't work for a large amount of information that has no formal categories and a non-expert user base.

Links:

  • The article Ontology is Overrated: Categories, Links, and Tags Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - May 22, 2005 - via InfoDesign

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Information architecture (13)  Navigation (56) 


 

28

The core principles of visual communication

According to Luke Wroblewski, visual communication is a key component of interface design and unfortunately often under-represented in interaction design methodologies.

A well thought-out visual organization "can greatly enhance usability by grouping information into meaningful page elements and sequences. Such a system relies on an understanding of how people use visual relationships to distinguish objects and what those relationships reveal to viewers..."

In a presentation, Luke Wroblewski introduces the core principles of visual communication and how they can be put to use in the design of web applications.

Links:

  • Visual Communication & Web Application Design Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - May 01, 2005 - via InfoDesign

Permanent link Comments (1)

See also: Visual design (16)  Talks and presentations (12) 


 

29

30% of web users have low literacy

According to Jakob Nielsen 30% of web users have low literacy and the number will probably grow to 40% in the next five years.

Unlike higher-literacy users, lower-literacy users don't scan text. They can't understand a text by glancing at it and must carefully read word for word. Scrolling breaks their visual concentration and they start skipping text as soon as it becomes too dense.

Some recommendations:
- Use text aimed at a 6th grade reading level on important landing pages
- On other pages use an 8th grade reading level
- Place main points at the top of the pages
- Make search tolerant of misspellings
- Simplify navigation
- Streamline the page design
- Avoid text that moves or changes

A study showed that revising the text of a web site for lower-literacy users made it perform significant better for both lower- and higher-literacy users.

Links:

  • The article Lower-Literacy Users Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - March 17, 2005

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Accessibility (11)  Text (19)  Tips and guidelines (80) 


 

30

Eyetracking study of e-commerce sites

Eyetools Inc and MarketingSherpa have published the report "The Landing Page Handbook". The report describes the results of an eyetracking study of typical e-commerce sites and has design guidelines for improving web page layout.

Some highlights from the report:
- The upper-left corner is always seen
- Most web pages are scanned, not read
- Any text that is underlined or blue get high readership and many people will read only the emphasized text before deciding to read on
- Material underneath images is viewed quite often
- People experience such a strong pull to look at images that they can trump left-to-right reading
- Navigational links or bottoms usually distract visitors from the main purpose of the page

Links:

  • The article Are Your Visitors Seeing What You Think? Open link in new window
  • The book The Landing Page Handbook Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - March 03, 2005 - via UI Designer

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Books (44)  Research (105)  E-commerce (23)  Eye-tracking (14) 


 
<< Back | More posts >>

Browse GUUUI postings

Methods and the design process

Prototyping and wireframing (54)  Usability testing (45)  Cost-justification and ROI (24)  The design process (17)  Personas (17)  User research (18)  Eye-tracking (14)  Card sorting (11)  Expert reviews (9)  Web traffic analysis (11)  Implementing user-centred design (8)  Site and flow diagramming (5)  Use Cases (3)  Envisionments (2) 

Design elements

Navigation (56)  Web page design (31)  Search (24)  Text (19)  Forms (19)  Links (15)  Guidelines and Standards (12)  Site design (10)  Design patterns (8)  Shopping Carts (8)  Ads (9)  Error handling (6)  Home pages (6)  Sections (5)  E-mails (2)  Help (3)  Sitemaps (2)  Personalization (1)  Print-friendly (1) 

General aspects

E-commerce (23)  Visual design (16)  Persuasive design (14)  Information architecture (13)  Accessibility (11)  Search engines (6)  Credibility, Trust and Privacy (6)  Emotional design (6)  Simplicity vs. capability (5)  Web applications (5)  Intranets (2) 

Technology

Flash (6)  Javascript (3)  URLs (3)  Browsers (2)  Download time (2)  Web standards (2) 

Humour

Bad designs (13)  Cartoons (12)  Fun music and videos (11)  Funny tools and games (10)  Fun with Jakob Nielsen (7)  Misc humor (8)  Designs with humor (3)  Fun posters (2)  Funny 404 pages (2) 

Resource types

Research (105)  Tips and guidelines (80)  Tools (68)  Books (44)  Audio and video (24)  Cases and Examples (20)  Interviews (17)  GUUUI articles (11)  Primers (11)  Talks and presentations (12)  Online books (5)  Posters (5)  Glossaries (3)  People and organisations (3) 

Information sources

Blogs (12)  Websites (11)  Discussion lists (4)  News (3)  Newsletters (3)  Online magazines (3)  Wikis (1) 

 
     
  To the front pageSign inTo the frontpageSearch in GUUUI postingsAbout GUUUI