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41

How to optimize landing page performance

Marketing Experiments Journal has made a number of A/B tests of landing pages (the pages people land on clicking ads or search result links).

They found that landing page performance can be improved by:
- Focusing on one objective for each page and driving everything on the page to that one objective
- Using a vertical flow through the centre of the page
- Eliminating elements that may distract eye path from the flow toward the objective
- Using visual elements to draw attention toward the call to action
- Avoiding use of off-page links

Links:

  • Landing Page Confusion-How Does Having More Than One Objective to a Page Affect its Performance? Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 08, 2007 - via Copyblogger

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Research (129)  Persuasive design (21)  E-commerce (27)  Landing pages (5)  Web page design (40) 


 

42

Introductory text should explain the purpose of a web page

According to Jacob Nielsen, the filler text and platitudes found at the top of many web pages should be replaced with text explaining the pages' purpose:

- What will users find on this page, what's its function?
- Why should they care, what's in it for them?

Links:

  • Blah-Blah Text: Keep, Cut, or Kill? Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - October 01, 2007

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See also: Tips and guidelines (95)  Text (24)  Web page design (40) 


 

43

How to render primary and secondary buttons in forms

In an eye-tracking study, Luke Wroblewski has looked at how users experience primary and secondary buttons (e.g. Submit and Cancel) in forms.

He found that creating visual distinction between primary and secondary buttons help people make good choices. An effective way to do this is to present secondary buttons as links. He also found that positioning the buttons to the left, in alignment with the input fields, increases completion times.

Links:

  • Primary & Secondary Actions in Web Forms Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - September 07, 2007

Permanent link Comments (2)

See also: Forms (30)  Research (129) 


 

44

Jared Spool on how to structure sites with lots of content

In this episode of the UIE Usability Tools podcast, Jared is interviewed about how to use department and store pages to subcategorize sites with lots of content.

Jared talks about:
- How department and store pages help narrow down the content choices for users
- How Department pages help users make confident choices between galleries
- What sites successfully take advantage of department pages
- What common mistakes designers make when implementing department and store pages

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: Department and Store Pages Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 30, 2007

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Sections (8)  Site design (14)  Navigation (63)  Interviews (30) 


 

45

Jared Spool on gallery pages

In this second episode of UIE Usability Tools Podcast, Jared Spool is interviewed about UIE's research on gallery pages, that is, pages with lists of links to content.

In the podcast, Jared talks about:
- How galleries help users make confident choices
- What behaviour users exhibit when gallery pages fail them
- How to order links so users can successfully find their content
- Why alphabetized links are often viewed as randomly ordered links
- How to utilize trigger words, the specific words that have meaning to users
-Why longer gallery pages may help users

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: Gallery Pages Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 30, 2007

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Sections (8)  Site design (14)  Navigation (63)  Interviews (30) 


 

46

How to cure banner blindness

According to Jakob Nielsen, these are the four most effective ways to attract peoples' eyeballs to ads:

- Making ads look like dialog boxes
- Making ads look like native content
- Using plain text
- Including faces
- Including cleavage and other "private" body parts

While Jakob finds that the last three present no ethical dilemmas, the first two do: Making an ad look like native content violates publishing's principle of separating editorial content and paid advertisement. Making it look like a dialog box is just plain deceptive.

In the article, Jakob also discusses how banner blindness is still real: Users don't look at anything that resembles ads, even if they aren't. If they glance at them, they typically don't engage with them. Often, they don't even see the advertiser's logo or name.

Links:

  • Banner Blindness: Old and New Findings Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 20, 2007

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See also: Research (129)  Ads (9) 


 

47

Common shopping cart mistakes

In this article, SURL revisits a study from 2002 of common e-commerce problems. They found that all of the following 2002 issues remain in 2007:

- Calling a shopping cart anything but a shopping cart or whatever is appropriate for the target users of the site's location
- Requiring users to click "Buy" instead of "Add to shopping cart"
- Giving little to no visual feedback that an item has been added to the cart
- Forcing the user to view the shopping cart every time an item is placed there
- Asking the user to buy other related items before adding an item to the cart
- Requiring a user to register before adding an item to the cart
- Requiring a user to change the quantity to zero to remove an item from the cart
- Not making it evident how to update the items in the shopping cart
- Requiring a user to scroll to find an update cart button
- Requiring a user to check out before showing the final costs including shipping and tax

Links:

  • Top Ten Mistakes of Shopping Cart Design Revisited Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 12, 2007

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See also: Research (129)  E-commerce (27)  Shopping Carts (9) 


 

48

Jared Spool on how to design home pages

In the first episode of the weekly UIE Usability Tools Podcast, Christine Perfetti interviews Jared Spool about his thinking on home page design.

In the podcast, they discuss:
- Why a site's home page is actually the least important page on your site
- How the most successful designs focus on understanding users' main goals and tasks
- How "link-rich" home pages can help your users find their content
- How the most successful home page designs focus on driving users to the most important content pages
- Why users spend little time on the best home pages

Links:

  • Usability Tools Podcast: Home Page Design Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - August 06, 2007

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See also: Audio and video (48)  Home pages (9)  Interviews (30) 


 

49

Stop worrying about the fold

According to Milissa Tarquini, the myth that users don't want to scroll is doing everyone a great disservice, most of all the users. Cramming as much information as possible above the fold of pages complicates the information design.

In her article, Milissa shows evidence from studies and examples from AOL that disproves the myth that users don't scroll. Her recommendation is to stop worrying about the fold and open op page designs to give users some visual breathing room.

Links:

  • Blasting the Myth of the Fold Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - July 31, 2007

Permanent link Comments (0)

See also: Web page design (40) 


 

50

Words such as folksonomy, blog, and wiki make people shudder

According to a survey of 2,091 adults, words such as "Blog", "netiquette", "cookie" and "wiki" have been voted among the most irritating words spawned by the Internet.

On the top five most hated words was:

1. Folksonomy (collaborative classification of information)
2. Blogosphere (collective name for blogs)
3. Blog
4. Netiquette (etiquette on the internet)
5. Blook (book based on blog)

Links:

  • Blog, cookie, wiki top list of hated Internet words: poll Open link in new window

Henrik Olsen - June 22, 2007 - via Adaptive Path

Permanent link Comments (2)

See also: Text (24) 


 

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