To the frontpage
SEARCH IN GUUUI POSTINGS
Tip: Use quotes to search for an exact phrase (e.g. "Jakob Nielsen")

You are browsing the subject "Research and Statistics " in which 39 posting(s) was found

1

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
Optimal line length on monitors
Dr. Bob Bailey has looked at the literature about optimal line length when reading from a monitor:

"What can we conclude when users are reading prose text from monitors? Users tend to read faster if the line lengths are longer (up to 10 inches). If the line lengths are too short (2.5 inches or less) it may impede rapid reading. Finally, users tend to prefer lines that are moderately long (4 to 5 inches)."

Links:
The article Optimal Line Length: Research Supporting

Henrik Olsen | June 01, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this posting

2

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
Using Photographs to Increase Trust in a Website
According to Dr. Bob Bailey, current research and studies show that staff photographs increase peoples trust in a website. But they should be used with care. In a study of online shopping, the photographs had a positive impact on non-experienced shoppers, while some experienced shoppers rejected them as fluff.

Links:
The article Using Photographs to Increase Trust in a Website

Henrik Olsen | May 19, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this posting

3

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
Usability Myths Need Reality Checks
Will Schroeder looks at some common Usability myths that have cemented themselves into our profession's foundation and started questioning how they got there.

Links:
UIE - Usability Myths Need Reality Checks

Tim Lucas | March 24, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this postingComments to this posting (5)

4

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
Browsing vs. searching for product information
UIE have tested whether users shopping online prefer to search or use category links when looking for specific products. They found that the design of the site and the type of products being sold determined user behaviour. Even though many users claim that they always go to search immediately, there wasnít a single user in the study who always chose the search engine first. On the contrary, 20% of the participants chose links exclusively. UIE concludes that users seem to use the search engine as a fallback when links donít satisfy their needs.

Links:
The article Are There Users Who Always Search?

Henrik Olsen | March 22, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this posting

5

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
How experts evaluate web sites' credibility
In parallel with Stanford Persuasive Technology Labís study of how average people evaluate web sitesí credibility (previously mentioned here at GUUUI), Sliced Bread Design and Comsumer WebWatch conducted a study of how industry experts rate credibility of the very same sites. The results showed that experts where far less concerned about visual appeal and were more concerned about the quality of a siteís information.

The comparative studies suggest that while people without deep knowledge and personal interest in a site will judge it by its visual design, people involved in a siteís professional domain are more concerned about the quality and accuracy of the content.

Links:
Discussion of the studies
The report Experts vs. Online Consumers (PDF)
Previous posting about how average people evaluate web sitesí credibility

Henrik Olsen | March 19, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this posting

6

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
Cascading vs. index menu layouts
SURL has compared user performance and satisfaction of horizontal and vertical cascading menus to a categorical index menu layout. They found considerable differences in task completion times that strongly favoured the index menu. The poorest performer, both objectively and subjectively, was the horizontal dropdown menu.

Links:
The article Cascading versus Indexed Menu Design

Henrik Olsen | March 17, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this posting

7

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
The Internet has become a mainstream information tool
Paw Internet & American Life Project have done a survey on how Americans engage online with government, health care providers, the news media, and commercial enterprises. The study shows that Americans have high expectation about the information and services available online. For many Internet users, the web is the first place to which they turn, when they need key information.

Some interesting findings:
- 70% of all American internet users said that they mostly find what they want when they look for information online
- 63% say they expect to find information at a storeís Web site about a product they may want to purchase
- If a store provides information online, even if it doesnít sell products at its Web site, 46% said this would make them more likely to go to the physical store to buy the product
- 85% of those who have ever bought products online say that they always (29%) or most of the time (56%) are able to find and buy the products they seek

Links:
The report Counting on the Internet

Henrik Olsen | March 10, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this postingComments to this posting (1)

8

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
How people evaluate a web site's credibility
Consumer WebWatch has published a research report by B. J. Fogg and the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab on how people evaluate web sitesí credibility. 100 sites in 10 content categories were studied and total of 2,684 people completed the survey.

When asked to comment on siteís credibility, the top 10 issues addressed by the survey participants was:

1. Design Look (46.1%)
2. Information Design/Structure (28.5%)
3. Information Focus (25.1%)
4. Company Motive (15.5%)
5. Information Usefulness (14.8%)
6. Information Accuracy (14.3%)
7. Name Recognition and Reputation (14.1%)
8. Advertising (13.8%)
9. Information Bias (11.6%)
10. Writing Tone (9.0%)

Links:
The research report How Do People Evaluate a Web Site's Credibility?
Discussion on why visual design is so prominent in the study

Henrik Olsen | March 05, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this postingComments to this posting (3)

9

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
The web has grown into a commercial tool
A study of search behaviour published in march 2002 suggests that the web has evolved from an entertainment into a business and information medium in the period from September 1997 to may 2001. Search topics have shifted from pornography and entertainment to subject related to commerce, travel, employment, or economy (24,7%) and people, places, or things (19,7%).

While search topics have shifted, the study showed little change in user search behaviours. Some key findings:

- Most people submit a singe short query (50%)
- Users are viewing fewer search results pages (51% view only one page)
- The use of Boolean operators has increased from 5 to 10 percent

The study included more than one million search queries submitted by more than 200,000 users of the Excite search engine.

Links:
The article From E-Sex to E-Commerce: Web Search Changes

Henrik Olsen | March 02, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this posting

10

New posting added after your last visit at GUUUIResearch and Statistics
Scrolling is faster that paging
SURL has examined the use of paging vs. scrolling in reading passages of text. The study showed that that it took the participants significantly longer to read text split into multiple pages compared to full text layouts, where they had to scroll.

"Participants stated that they found the Paging condition to be "too broken up," and that they had to "go back and forth" quite a bit to search for information. It is possible then, that for searching as well, viewing more of the document on a single screen facilitated easier scanning."

Links:
The article The Impact of Paging vs. Scrolling on Reading Online Text Passages

Henrik Olsen | Febuary 27, 2003

Click here for a permanent link you can bookmark or refer toAdd a comment on this posting


More >>

BROWSE SUBJECTS IN GUUUI POSTINGS
 

Research and Statistics (39)
Research and statistics on user behaviour, trends, demographics, technological issues, etc.

Methods and the Design Process (35)
Design techniques and development workflow.

Resources and Tools (35)
Sites, journals, mailing lists, software, and other useful stuff.

Tips and Guidelines (29)
Recommendations and design guidelines.

Books (22)
Reviews and sample chapters of books of interest to the interactive design community.

Humor (22)
Fun stuff for the interactive design community.

 

Business and Strategy (17)
Strategy, marketing, merchandising, ROI and the like.

News, Weblogs, and Magazines (14)
News, weblogs, and magazines of interest to the interactive design community.

Cases and Examples (9)
Case studies and examples of good and bad design.

Interviews (9)
Interviews of interest to the interactive design community.

Technology (6)
Browsers, HTML, frames, Flash etc. and their impact on usability.

Communication and Visual Design (4)
Communication, Visual Design, Information Design, Graphic Design, branding and the like.

Organisations (1)
Organisations involved in the interactive design community